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Collision Detection Algorithms
view article Advanced Collision Detection Techniques 1 - The Big Picture
This article assumes a basic understanding of the geometry and math involved in collision detection, and covers some advanced collision detection techniques.
view article Advanced Collision Detection Techniques 2 - Portal Engines and Object-Object Collisions
Portal-based engines divide a scene or world into smaller convex polyhedral sections. Convex polyhedra are well-suited for the graphics pipeline because they eliminate overdraw. Unfortunately, for the purpose of collision detection, convex polyhedra present us with some difficulties.
view article Advanced Collision Detection Techniques 3 - Detecting Collisions Using Hierarchy Trees
Now, let’s assume that we have either our OBB or AABB trees. How do we actually perform collision detection? We’ll take two trees and check whether two initial boxes overlap. If they do, they might intersect, and we’ll have to recursively process them further (recursive descent).
view article BSP Tree FAQ
The purpose of this document is to provide answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Binary Space Partitioning (BSP) Trees.
view article Collision Detection: Vertex-in-triangle check
"The last tutorial thought you how to check if a ray intersect with a plane and what's the distance to that plane (as long as there is any intersection). Since we only use triangles (which aren't inifinite), we need to check if that ray intersects also with a triangle that is ON the plane..."
view article Collision Detection
I've attempted here to write a tutorial that anyone with a basic understanding of 3D concepts and linear algebra should be able to pick up on quickly. If you're already familiar with collision detection, there's no real reason to read further.
view article Collision Detection Tutorial - Part 1: Sphere/Plane intersection
This tutorial is meant to be as simple as possible, therefore you can't really do something useful with it. The idea is not to let the sphere (player) get too close to the plane (wall).
view article Collision Detection Tutorial - Part 2: Ray/Plane Intersection
Amir has posted part 2 of his collision detection series. This tutorial is about Ray/Plane intersection (which is quite important). The goal of this tutorial is to create a function that will calculate the distance between a ray and a plane. Don't forget to check out Part 1: Sphere/Plane Intersection.
Collision Detection Algorithms
view article Collision Response: Bouncy, Trouncy, Fun
Apply forces and acceleration to particles and you get the big "D" word: dynamics. With the help of a virtual Jello simulator, Jeff Lander investigates how particle dynamics affects collision response.
view article GDC 2001: BSP Collision Detection As Used In MDK2 and NeverWinter Nights
So how should we handle the separate problem of collision and navigating of a character in a 3D environment? In the real world this is achieved by "left foot forward", "right foot forward", and so on. In a video game the user has an avatar which is often a biped, so why not implement something analogous to how things work in the real world? This paper first discusses player control and navigation in an action oriented 3D game.
view article Simple Bounding-Sphere Collision Detection
This article explains the simple process of using bounding sphere to detect collisions in 3D environments.
view article When Two Hearts Collide: Axis-Aligned Bounding Boxes
Most discussions of collision detection for real-time game applications begin with bounding spheres and bounding boxes. While fast, bounding spheres don't generally give the best approximation of an object's extent. Jeff Lander demonstrates the use of axis-aligned bounding boxes for 3D collision detection.

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